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Mapping Out Your Geotargeting Strategy

Timing and location is key when you are running digital advertising campaigns. If you can reach your ideal audience at the exact time and location that will increase the likelihood of them taking an action then you’ll put your ad dollars to work. Location not only refers to where they are surfing the web, but their real-time physical location. This is where having a defined geotargeting strategy comes into play.

Geotargeting is the practice of delivering content to a consumer – via mobile or web – using the geographic location information of the recipient. You need to determine if, and how geotargeting will help you achieve your overall campaign goals.

Consider a scenario: you are advertising for a rideshare company, with a partnership with a sports team – where would your audience be? If you target the arena where their event is taking place, you are sure to capture potential riders as they browse their smartphones, looking for a way home. This would be considered geo-radius targeting – setting specific location parameters based on Lat/Long coordinates or addresses.

In addition to understanding your goals, ask yourself about your creative message – is the message relevant to your target?  For instance, if the creative messaging is general, it may not make sense to leverage geo-radius targeting, as it can limit your scale and become costlier.

Some Geotargeting Options in Action:

  1. Geographic Targeting: Target based on Country, Province/State, or City/Town level. Consider using the DMA function – originally a tool designed for traditional media, DMAs have easily translated over to the digital landscape. When targeting a city, it’s best to include the DMA to increase overall reach and potential to reach users on borders.
  2. Zip/Postal Code: Within the US and Canada, you can upload a list of zip codes/postal codes to reach users. Consider this option if your creative messaging is centric around specific storefronts – a prime example of this is a pizza chain, advertising a discount within their delivery area.
  3. Geo-Radius: Leverage a list of addresses or Lat/Long coordinates, customizing your radius down to the mile/kilometre to target users in mobile in-app environments.. Consider how large the area is that you are targeting. For example, if you are targeting a metropolitan area that is more spread out, such as Omaha, consider a larger radius than you would if you were targeting New York City. You might even explore this geotargeting option when running a competitive conquesting campaign – Dunkin can target Starbucks locations to acquire new customers.

    According to a report from eMarketer, marketers found that even geofencing in real time “for both retail and QSRs [quick-service restaurants], connecting with the consumer when they’re already in-store accounts for really low engagement rates—much lower effectiveness than connecting with somebody within 2 to 3 miles of that location.”

  4. Geo-Radius Retargeting: Collect users around a specific geo-radius and retarget them with a relevant message at a later time.

StackAdapt’s data is not only able to target the most niche of markets but it also has the capabilities to capture them in specific geos. And in addition to offering the above geotargeting, StackAdapt also offers store lift reporting through partnerships with Cuebiq and PlaceIQ, which can help you further understand traffic per store, daily traffic trends, distance driven and more! Interested?

Reach out to your Account Executive today to learn more. Not a StackAdapt customer? You’ll definitely want to be now – find out about our geotargeting capabilities (and so much more) today.

5 min read

State of Conversions: How to Measure Across DSPs

As digital media continues to dominate the advertising world, digital-savvy clients are questioning which channels work best, and which technology partners they should continue investing with. However, there remains an industry-wide problem of conversion attribution.

According to eMarketer, the digital buyer today is expected to use 4 different DSPs, down significantly from 2016’s estimate of 7, and yet despite the drop of almost half the tech, it is still hard to measure cross-channel conversions.

It’s not that there is a lack of tools – the primary problem is the industry itself; the rise of wall-gardened inventory sources such as Google, Amazon, and Facebook have made it increasingly difficult to help gather results and understand where and which platform drove which conversions, let alone cross-device conversions.

This makes it extremely difficult to point out if, and when users will be able to have a holistic view of their digital buys. But as a savvy digital media buyer, there are a few strategies that may help you to further refine your data and to have a strong understanding of where your conversions are coming from.

1. Leverage an ad-server

By using an ad-server, you can generate both ad tags and 1×1 impression/click trackers and use their pixel as your conversion point’s source of truth. It is strongly recommended that you piggyback your DSP’s pixels into the ad-server’s, as it will enable your DSP(s) to collect the necessary data to feed its algorithm and enable you to optimize towards your CPA goals within the platform.

Most ad-servers do have a reporting tool that will distinguish which conversion belongs to which tag, and, depending on the tool’s level of reporting, can further dissect this information across devices as well.

Keep in mind that some DSPs only support impression trackers (this is common amongst social media partners).

2. Make sure your lookback windows are aligned

Digital media buyers also need to consider how their pixel is set up. Believe it or not, most DSP pixels have set lookback windows when it comes to both post-view and post-click conversions. This can result in a DSP taking credit for another DSP’s conversion, or worse, duplicate the numbers. This is an important consideration when comparing your results and determining the effectiveness of your digital strategy.

Whatever your lookback window may be, be sure that all pixels are set up to the exact same timeframe prior to launch so that you are comparing apples to apples.

3. Use Google Analytics

If you’re not ready to commit to an ad-server, consider using Google Analytics and building UTMs. Once done, set your goals in GA and begin tracking your campaign.

Remember, in addition to creating a UTM parameter for the campaign source, make sure to incorporate parameters for both campaign medium and campaign name to distinguish what strategy drove what result.

Use this great resource tool for building UTMs. Note that Google Analytics will only count post-click conversions if you are running media outside of GDN.

4. Consider a multi-channel DSP

StackAdapt may have started as a native-first DSP, but we incorporated video and display a few years ago. After being ranked the #1 native advertising and the #1 video platform, it makes sense to leverage our omnichannel offering.

And with our Conversion Journey tool, you can understand the touchpoints of your results. The StackAdapt Conversion Journey tool gives you visibility on information such as click to conversion and domain to conversion. Additionally, you are able to pass back other data points, such as order ID and product SKUs.

 

 

Contact your StackAdapt representative to learn more or request a demo to see our Conversion Journey tool and much more in action.

 

8 min read